Host Student Interns

Internships & Cooperative Work Experience

Internships & Cooperative Work Experience allow students to apply classroom knowledge to real work situations and ultimately build skills, bulk up their resume & college applications, network, explore careers, and earn credit. By hosting Internship & Cooperative Work Experience students, businesses & organizations also experience benefits. Here's how:

 

Benefits

  • Year-round source of highly motivated students

  • New perspectives, ideas, and energy

  • Increased visibility on campus for the organization

  • Quality candidates for temporary or seasonal positions and projects

  • Freedom for professional staff to pursue other projects

  • Flexible, cost-effective workforce not requiring a long-term employer commitment

  • Strategic method to recruit and evaluate potential employees

  • Enhanced community image as employers contribute expertise to the educational landscape

FAQ: Internships & Cooperative Work Experience

What are the time committments for internships and CWE?


  • Students are placed with their host sites for at least one term (11 weeks)
    • Placements can be extended if both parties are in agreement
  • Students typically spend about 10 -15 hours per week at their host site but this can vary depending on employer and student
  • College students earn 1 credit per 30 hours worked at their host site
  • High school students earn .5 credits per 70 hours worked at their host site




How does the Fair Labor and Standards Act (FLSA) apply to internships?


Many employers ask if they are legally required to pay students enrolled in an internship. The answer to that question depends on whether or not the student is considered an employee subject to the requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The FLSA requires employers to pay all employees at the rate of not less than current minimum wage. The Department of Labor (DOL) has developed criteria to assist employers in identifying when a student is not considered an employee within the meaning of the FLSA:

  • The training, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to that which would be given in a vocation school.
  • The training is for the benefit of the trainees or students.
  • The trainees or students do not displace regular employees, but work under their close observation.
  • The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the trainees or students, and on occasion the employer's operations may actually be impeded.
  • The trainees or students are not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the training period.
  • The employer and the trainees or students understand that the trainees or students are not entitled to wages for the time spent in training.
A student who does not meet all of the above criteria will be considered an employee covered by the FLSA and therefore the employer is legally obligated to provide compensation for his or her services. As with all matters requiring legal interpretation, it is always wise for employers to work closely with their own legal department to ensure compliance with federal and applicable state laws. For more information visit the Department of Labor.




What is an internship?


As defined by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, an internship is a form of experiential learning that integrates knowledge and theory learned in the classroom with practical application and skills development in a professional setting. Internships give students the opportunity to gain valuable applied experience and make connections in professional fields they are considering for career paths; and give employers the opportunity to guide and evaluate talent.




What is Cooperative Work Experience? (CWE)


Cooperative Work Experience (CWE) is a structured educational experience integrating classroom studies with learning through productive work experiences in a field related to a student’s academic program. Often, internships & CWE are used interchangably. The main difference is, CWE is a degree requirement for a specific program, where an internship is not. Both are very important to a student's educaitonal experience. Many of the programs at TBCC require a CWE experience as the capstone course taken prior to earning a degree or certificate. For example, a student earning a criminal justice degree will need to enroll in a co-op at the end of their degree program and will be placed at a site closely related to their program, such as a county sheriff's office.





FAQ: Internships & Cooperative Work Experience

What are the time committments for internships and CWE?


  • Students are placed with their host sites for at least one term (11 weeks)
    • Placements can be extended if both parties are in agreement
  • Students typically spend about 10 -15 hours per week at their host site but this can vary depending on employer and student
  • College students earn 1 credit per 30 hours worked at their host site
  • High school students earn .5 credits per 70 hours worked at their host site




How does the Fair Labor and Standards Act (FLSA) apply to internships?


Many employers ask if they are legally required to pay students enrolled in an internship. The answer to that question depends on whether or not the student is considered an employee subject to the requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The FLSA requires employers to pay all employees at the rate of not less than current minimum wage. The Department of Labor (DOL) has developed criteria to assist employers in identifying when a student is not considered an employee within the meaning of the FLSA:

  • The training, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to that which would be given in a vocation school.
  • The training is for the benefit of the trainees or students.
  • The trainees or students do not displace regular employees, but work under their close observation.
  • The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the trainees or students, and on occasion the employer's operations may actually be impeded.
  • The trainees or students are not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the training period.
  • The employer and the trainees or students understand that the trainees or students are not entitled to wages for the time spent in training.
A student who does not meet all of the above criteria will be considered an employee covered by the FLSA and therefore the employer is legally obligated to provide compensation for his or her services. As with all matters requiring legal interpretation, it is always wise for employers to work closely with their own legal department to ensure compliance with federal and applicable state laws. For more information visit the Department of Labor.




What is an internship?


As defined by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, an internship is a form of experiential learning that integrates knowledge and theory learned in the classroom with practical application and skills development in a professional setting. Internships give students the opportunity to gain valuable applied experience and make connections in professional fields they are considering for career paths; and give employers the opportunity to guide and evaluate talent.




What is Cooperative Work Experience? (CWE)


Cooperative Work Experience (CWE) is a structured educational experience integrating classroom studies with learning through productive work experiences in a field related to a student’s academic program. Often, internships & CWE are used interchangably. The main difference is, CWE is a degree requirement for a specific program, where an internship is not. Both are very important to a student's educaitonal experience. Many of the programs at TBCC require a CWE experience as the capstone course taken prior to earning a degree or certificate. For example, a student earning a criminal justice degree will need to enroll in a co-op at the end of their degree program and will be placed at a site closely related to their program, such as a county sheriff's office.




Host Site Considerations


Developing a successful internship program requires planning and organization, so neither the organization nor intern are disappointed with the experience. The clearer you are about goals and how those goals are achieved, the easier it is to implement the program. Internship development should answer these questions:

  • Why do you want an internship program? What do you hope to gain from it? How will you achieve your goals?
  • What will your intern learn and gain from the experience? What tasks/responsibilities do you want your intern to perform? Who will train and supervise your intern?
  • What resources will be needed? Will you pay your intern? How much?
Remember, internships are mutually beneficial – the intern should benefit from the internship as much as your company benefits from hiring the individual. A good program provides opportunities for a student to learn about the employer's work environment and industry.




Employer Responsibilities


  • Interview and hire students
  • Sign the agreement
  • Approve student learning outcomes
  • Develop a work schedule
  • Provide a safe & inclusive work environment
  • Provide time to orient, train and give feedback to students
  • Periodically review progress with students
  • Meet twice during the term with the student and instructor at your worksite
  • Evaluate student's performance at the end of the term





Become a host site, support students in their programs & career interests

Internships allow students to explore careers and develop skills in industries of their interest. By partnering with education through Tillamook Works, employers can take an active role in developing our county's future workforce and their entry-level employees. 

Host students with specific career related interests or from one of the following academic programs:

Important Dates:

Spring Term Internships


To become a host site, complete the following by January 15th:

  • Create business profile
  • Meet/talk with internship coordinator
  • Submit job description to coordinator or via Handshake
Student Interviews begin February Student start dates begin mid - late March